So You Want a Revolution?

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Well, Christopher Locke writes in Chapter 7 of Cluetrain that an online one has already begun.  He adds, “And by the way, since it’s not being covered by CNN and Fox, we’re winning.  You say you didn’t notice anything out of the ordinary? Nor were you supposed to. Invisibility and ignorance are powerful weapons.”  Normally, I think of invisibility and ignorance as negative things.  Futuristic, dystopian societies in novels such as Brave New World and Fahrenheit 451 come to my mind.  However, Locke says invisibility and ignorance have actually been beneficial for the revolution talked about in Cluetrain.  Under the noses of corporations, among other groups, ordinary people have been using their voices through the Internet, which has become a source of empowerment.  Discovering and then using one’s voice has been a common theme throughout Cluetrain, and chapters 6 and 7 continue this message.   

Something I’ve noticed throughout this book is that the authors present ideas and issues, but they don’t provide answers to questions.  Chapter 6 is full of questions.  One particular passage written by Christopher Locke and David Weinberger stood out to me:
“But there is a heartfelt question lurking here. It has to do with the things of the world that quench our thirsts and raise our souls. It has to do with our fear of replacing the shops — and the neighborhoods they enable — with a paper-souled efficiency that lets us search out and consume commodity products at disquietingly low prices. We’re afraid that the last shred of human skin left on the bones of commerce is about to come off in our hands.”
I had an online “talk” with someone, and I mentioned how I think it’s easier for me to express myself online than in person because I’m sometimes more open and “outgoing” when I write than when I talk to people.  That’s why I like forms of communication such as e-mail and instant messaging, and I’m not too crazy about talking over the phone.  However, she and I both agreed that in spite of the conveniences of online communication, it still doesn’t beat communicating with someone in person.  There’s just something about that face-to-face contact that seems more natural and special.  I think it’s a worry for many people that although we can connect to each other in more ways than before, are we making deep connections?  Although Cluetrain doesn’t provide any simple answers, it brings up points for people to ponder over as they read. 

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One Response to “So You Want a Revolution?”

  1. internet » Archive » Wed 14 March Says:

    […] So You Want a Revolution? Well, Christopher Locke writes in Chapter 7 of Cluetrain that an online one has already begun. He adds, And by the way, since it s not being covered by CNN and Fox, we re winning. You say you didn t notice anything out of the ordinary? Nor were you supposed to. Invisibility and ignorance are powerful weapons. Normally, I think of invisibility and ignorance as negative things. Futuristic, dystopian societies in novels such as Brave New World and Fahrenheit 451 come to my mind. However, Locke says invisibility and ignorance have actually been beneficial for the revolution talked about in Cluetrain. Under the noses of corporations, among other groups, ordinary people have been using their voices through the Internet, which has become a source of empowerment. Discovering and then using one s voice has been a common theme throughout Cluetrain, and chapters 6 and 7 continue this message. Something I ve noticed throughout this book is that the authors present ideas and issues, but they don t provide answers to questions. Chapter 6 is full of questions. One particular passage written by Christopher Locke and David Weinberger stood out to me: But there is a heartfelt question lurking here. It has to do with the things of the world that quench our thirsts and raise our souls. It has to do with our fear of replacing the shops ” and the neighborhoods they enable ” with a paper-souled efficiency that lets us search out and consume commodity products at disquietingly low prices. We re afraid that the last shred of human skin left on the bones of commerce is about to come off in our hands. I had an online talk with someone, and I mentioned how I think it s easier for me to express myself online than in person because I m sometimes more open and outgoing when I write than when I talk to people. That s why I like forms of communication such as e-mail and instant messaging, and I m not too crazy about talking over the phone. However, she and I both agreed that in spite of the conveniences of online communication, it still doesn t beat communicating with someone in person. There s just something about that face-to-face contact that seems more natural and special. I think it s a worry for many people that although we can connect to each other in more ways than before, are we making deep connections? Although Cluetrain doesn t provide any simple answers, it brings up points for people to ponder over as they read. […]

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